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Research Article

Spike-Timing Theory of Working Memory

  • Botond Szatmáry,

    Affiliation: The Neurosciences Institute, San Diego, California, United States of America

    Current address: Brain Corporation, San Diego, California, United States of America

    X
  • Eugene M. Izhikevich mail

    Eugene.Izhikevich@braincorporation.com

    Affiliation: The Neurosciences Institute, San Diego, California, United States of America

    Current address: Brain Corporation, San Diego, California, United States of America

    X
  • Published: August 19, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000879

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One spiking model reproducing varying activity

Posted by SOVF on 20 Sep 2010 at 05:44 GMT

These systematically varying, persistent temporal firing profiles are similar to those observed experimentally in vivo in frontal cortex during the delay period of the WM task [1], [3], [38], [39], but no previous spiking model of WM could reproduce them.
http://ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000879#article1.body1.sec2.sec4.p1

The authors claim that no spiking model could reproduce the systematically varying, persistent firing profiles as observed in frontal cortex. It seems they were unaware of this paper:

Verduzco-Flores S, Bodner M, Ermentrout B, Fuster JM, Zhou Y (2009) Working Memory Cells' Behavior May Be Explained by Cross-Regional Networks with Synaptic Facilitation. PLoS ONE 4(8): e6399. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0006399

Link:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0006399

The cited paper reproduces the delay period firing patterns reported in the following, rather extensive study:

Shafi M, Zhou Y, Quintana J, Chow C, Fuster J, Bodner M (2007) Variability in neuronal activity in primate cortex during working memory tasks. Neuroscience 146: 1082–1106.

No competing interests declared.