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Research Article

Why Genes Evolve Faster on Secondary Chromosomes in Bacteria

  • Vaughn S. Cooper mail,

    vaughn.cooper@unh.edu

    Affiliation: Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, United States of America

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  • Samuel H. Vohr,

    Affiliation: Department of Computer Science, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, United States of America

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  • Sarah C. Wrocklage,

    Affiliation: Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, United States of America

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  • Philip J. Hatcher

    Affiliation: Department of Computer Science, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, United States of America

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  • Published: April 01, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000732

Reader Comments (3)

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Do genome rearrangement patterns differ between large/small chromosomes?

Posted by jeisen on 02 Apr 2010 at 18:51 GMT

Vaughn (aka Dr. Cooper)

I am wondering if you could provide any information about whether the genome rearrangement patterns vary between the large and small chromosomes. Specifically, do you know if the smaller elements show the symmetric inversions (relative to the origin/terminus) seen in the larger elements of many species?

No competing interests declared.

RE: Do genome rearrangement patterns differ between large/small chromosomes?

vscooper replied to jeisen on 13 Apr 2010 at 17:58 GMT

It appears from our alignments of bacterial genomes with multiple chromosomes that both content and gene order are more variable on secondary chromosomes. However I don't know whether the symmetric inversions commonly seen on the larger chromosomes are specifically the cause of this.

No competing interests declared.