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Research Article

A Whole-Body Model for Glycogen Regulation Reveals a Critical Role for Substrate Cycling in Maintaining Blood Glucose Homeostasis

  • Ke Xu,

    Affiliations: Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America, Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Kevin T. Morgan,

    Affiliation: Old Dogs in Training, Carrboro, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Abby Todd Gehris,

    Affiliation: Department of Mathematics, Broome Community College, Binghamton, New York, United States of America

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  • Timothy C. Elston mail,

    telston@amath.unc.edu (TCE); smgomez@unc.edu (SMG)

    Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Shawn M. Gomez mail

    telston@amath.unc.edu (TCE); smgomez@unc.edu (SMG)

    Affiliations: Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America, Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America, Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Published: December 01, 2011
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002272

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Publisher's Note: Errors in text and figure legends in Results/Discussion section

Posted by PLoS_CompBiol on 12 Sep 2012 at 17:49 GMT

Model overview
http://ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002272#article1.body1.sec2.sec1.p1

1) In ‘Results/Discussion’ under the heading ‘The cyclic-AMP (cAMP) induced glucose-glycogen circuitry’ and the subsection ‘Internal cues: cAMP activates a cascade of enzymes’, paragraph 2, the value of K_d corresponding to a fed state is incorrectly listed as 2 X 10^(-3) mM. The correct value is: 2 X 10^(-3) micro (/mu)M. Please view the correct equation here: http://www.ploscompbiol.org/corrections/pcbi.1002272.e004-e006.cn.tif

2) In the caption for Figure 6, third sentence, the values 13.4 and 30.6 are incorrectly switched. The correct sentence is: ‘Crossover of GSa and GPa occurs at 30.6 and 13.4 minutes respectively’.

3) In ‘Results/Discussion’ under the heading ‘The response time for glycogen synthesis decreases with a larger value of K_d in the glycogen depleted state’, paragraph 3, the references to Figure 6A-left panel and Figure 6B-left panel in the final two sentences are incorrectly switched. The reference to Figure 6B-right panel should precede the reference to Figure 6A-left panel.

4) In ‘Results/Discussion’ under the heading ‘The response time for glycogen synthesis decreases with a larger value of K_d in the glycogen depleted state’, paragraph 4, sentence 4, the value K_d = 2 X 10^(-3) micro M is incorrectly described as being indicated in Figure 6B by ‘a solid line with squares’. The correct description is ‘a red line with dots’.

5) In ‘Results/Discussion’ under the heading ‘The response time for glycogen synthesis decreases with a larger value of K_d in the glycogen depleted state’, paragraph 4, final sentence, the intersection of GSa and GPa is incorrectly given as “15 mins and 30.6 mins correspondingly”. The correct values are: “13.4 mins and 30.6 mins correspondingly”.

6) In ‘Results/Discussion’ under the heading ‘Conclusions’, paragraph 2, the penultimate sentence incorrectly mentions ‘a significant increase in response time’. The correct text is: ‘a significant decrease in response time’.

The authors would like to thank Andrey Dovzhenok of the University of Cincinnati for alerting them to these errors.

No competing interests declared.